The scales aren’t wrong (Sorry)

They may not give the full picture (body composition)and they are on occasion misleading short term  but they are not wrong and if used correctly they are a good measure of progress.

It’s become popular to hate on weighing yourself and the poor scales get a lot of bad press with the key arguments against them being they don’t account for fluctuations in water retention or food in the digestion process.

This is true but water retention tends to be fairly acute/short term. For example if your goal is weight loss and you’ve not lost weight for 4-6 weeks it’s unlikely water retention and more likely that you’re not losing fat.

(before someone says it – yes it *could* be recomposition i.e you are building muscle at the same rate you’re losing fat but this is less common than many would have you believe)

Why are the scales a good tool?

1) They are cheap and readily available
2) they are reliable
3) Easy to use and interpret ( I’m assuming you don’t know how to use and interpret a dexa- you’ll also need to sit through hours of radiation training)
4) It can be used frequently – it’s all well and good going to get a dexa scan or calliper reading but how frequently can you afford to do this and how often would you like feedback?

Things to remember:

Weight loss is not linear
Every measurement tool has its limitations and margins of error accept and acknowledge these before using the tool.

Take home:

Don’t be disheartened if you don’t lose weight week on week but equally don’t kid yourself if you’ve not lost weight (assuming you have weight to lose).

Also remember that diet and exercise offer far more benefits than purely weight loss so make sure you have some performance and/or mastery goals set for yourself too.

If you’re interested in a logical no nonsense approach follow this link to work with me:

https://emma642.typeform.com/to/SWzmNR

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